Tuesday, August 5, 2008

Paper Towns by John Green



Quentin is only weeks away from graduating high school, moving on to a good college and starting a successful life. However, he hits a little snag before that can happen. The unrequited love of his life, Margo Roth Spiegleman, who just happens to be his neighbor and childhood friend, un-expectantly shows up at Quentin’s window in the middle of the night. This visit sparks a night of pranks, revenge, and fun. It is one of the best nights of Quentin’s life, but it also sets him on a mysterious search that will change how he looks at the world forever. I was really excited to read this book and ecstatic when I got my hands on an ARC. It lived up to all my expectations. The characters were very well developed and the story kept me reading all night until I finished it. John Green has a wonderful grasp on what it means to be a teenager, especially a teenage boy, and he does a very good job making his characters seem very real. I would definitely give this a Thumps up, or YAY.

11 comments:

kevinyezbick said...

I also devoured an ARC and agree with an enthusiastic thumbs up that Mr. Green has produced perhaps his best work yet. I thought nothing could rival Looking for Alaska, but Paper Towns has met the challenge. The characters are honest, the descriptions are detailed - and the design is masterful.

Incorporating Whitman's Song of Myself as a piece of the puzzle that is Margo's disappearance will introduce many readers to the timeless masterpiece.

The scenes in which Quentin and his friends are visiting the Paper Towns themselves, plotted subdivisions that never got off the ground or the abandoned strip malls of tourist trap Florida - are conjured brilliantly. (Obviously the author had writing in mind when he did his urban exploring in Detroit last year.)

Thumbs Up. Wheee!

Josh B. said...

That is so funny. When I read those parts I remembered recently hearing a story about someone doing some Urban Exploring but I could not recollect who it was. Now I remember that John talked about that recently, I suppose at SI. I am glad you brought that to mind for me as that was really bugging me.

Also, I really agree on the Walt Whitman aspect. That poem became such a large part of Quentin’s search that I would be impressed if a teen reading this book didn’t at least think about reading for himself/herself.

Katie said...

Anyone want to share an ARC? I've been anxious to read this since SI. I'd gladly pay shipping

Josh B. said...

I would if i could but unfortunately it is not mine. Sorry.

kevinyezbick said...

Borrowed mine as well...sorry.

Allison said...

Just finished it. loved it, great humor, timeless, teen appeal. Glad I read it. it is a yes for me!

Deb Motley said...

Yay for me, too. I liked it more than Alaska and I really liked that.

Patty said...

This one was good, of course. I really enjoyed the 3rd part of the book, which was laugh out loud funny! Quentin is very philosophical (for a boy!) and I think I fell in love with him a little, too. Never mind that meanie Margo Roth Spiegelman.
Thumbs Up from an ardent fan!
Definitely for older teens, if just for the metaphysical (not physical) stuff.

Katie said...

I'm in for a yay as well. Some of the most thought-provoking writing out there.

kathy said...

Paper Towns is excellent. I like the philosophical explorations, quips, friendship dynamics and hilarious road trip adventure. I didn't find it as intense as Looking for Alaska (which I loved), but this also offers wider appeal. The interchanges between the boys range from rank to sublimely witty. Definitely a YAY.

Julie said...

I'm going to break with tradition and say that while I liked it, I didn't think it fantastic. Honestly, it seems like the same old John Green, nothing new. I hope I don't get beat up but I'm going to vote Nay.